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Be aware of the influence humans have on the health and viability of life on earth. Call attention to what fosters or harms Earth’s exquisite beauty, balances and interdependencies. Guided by Spirit, work to translate this understanding into ways of living that reflect our responsibility to one another, to the greater community of life, and to future generations.

Pacific Yearly Meeting, Advices and Queries, Harmony with Creation, Advices
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In our witness for the global environment, are we careful to consider justice and the well-being of the world’s poorest people? Does our way of life threaten the viability of life on Earth?

Pacific Yearly Meeting, Advices and Queries, Harmony with Creation, Queries for the Meeting
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Queers for the Climate releases Manifesto

New Post has been published on http://petersontoscano.com/its-our-fight-too-an-lgbtq-response-to-climate-change/

It’s Our Fight Too: An LGBTQ Response to Climate Change

As a member of the Queers for the Climate group  I will take an active role in the upcoming People’s Climate March on September 21, 2014. This past week I had the privilege to work with a group of others on creating a manifesto which serves as a call to action. Through a consensus process, we developed the following statement. Please consider getting involved over at the Queers for the Climate Facebook page, sign onto the manifesto (details below) and please share this manifesto on your own blog and through your social networks.

 

It’s Our Fight Too: An LGBTQ Response to Climate Change

We are LGBTQ people and we’re standing up to face climate change as the single biggest threat to humanity.

Progress on LGBTQ equality has demonstrated to the world that all people deserve dignity and respect. We must build on our successes to include future generations and those already suffering the impacts of climate changes.

Catastrophic climate change has the potential to further destabilize already stressed societies.Queer people, like many minority or marginalized communities around the world, will be especially vulnerable. We believe that LGBTQ movements have a responsibility to address the climate crisis now, before our community is placed at further risk.

We’ve trained for this fight. We have faced persecution because of who we are and stood up to those who denied our existence. Our communities faced near extinction throughout the early HIV/AIDS crisis. Today we are all facing the grave threat of an unstable climate.

While governments and corporations refused to acknowledge the severity of the AIDS crisis — an eerie parallel to the response to date on climate change — we educated the masses, told our stories, harnessed the media, raised money, and in a very short time moved nations and industries to act on behalf of people living with HIV around the world.

We’ve also made same-sex marriage, once unimaginable, a reality on almost every continent — now we must build on our successes by tackling our generation’s greatest challenge. We’ve already moved mountains, and we will do it again.

Lastly, we recognize that LGBTQ communities share a rich tradition of creative, fun, thought-provoking action. We build powerful alliances across classes, races, gender identities, and nationalities.

This moment is our opportunity to reignite these talents and our shared experiences toward a cause that benefits all people and the planet as a whole.

As a signatory to this letter*, I will do one or more of the below:

*To add your name or your organization to this letter, please email: queers-for-the-climate (at) googlegroups.com or joseph (at) avaaz.org

·      I will join the People’s Climate March on September 21st in New York City, and show my support by marching with the LGBTQ block

·      I will spread the word to my constituents, my business partners, my friends, family and community about the People’s Climate March

·      I will use social media, email blasts and other digital tools to rally support for the march in the weeks leading up to September 21st

Andy Bichlbaum, the Yes Men
Queers for the Climate

Act up global warming

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Prescott’s Climate Links #5 : Environmental Justice, Jamaica, and Technology

New Post has been published on http://petersontoscano.com/prescotts-climate-links-5/

Prescott’s Climate Links #5

Global Warming. Will technology save us? I know many of us hold onto a hope that some great invention will solve all of our climate woes. As you will see in our third link, addressing global warming will take more than just technology. But first, when I think of Global Warming, I don’t typically think of polar bears, bees, or sea coral–not that the threats they face are not real or urgent. I instead think of the people affected by climate change. I can’t help but think of myself and my husband and our friends and family in North America, Europe, and Southern Africa, and things we value that are at risk of being lost forever along with the feelings of fear over the uncertainty of it all. I also think of other people–farmers, women in Subsaharan Africa, and poor and working class people in cities around the world who have always had to deal with more pollution in their communities than their richer neighbors.  Before we look at technology first let’s consider links to two stories that look at people disproportionately affected by climate change–poor communities in California cities and women in Jamaica.

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For the past 18 months the state of California has implemented a carbon cap-and-trade program collecting millions of dollars from companies who pollute. According to the original law, 25% of the revenue is suppose to go towards poorer communities adversely affected by pollution. Because of a budget shortfall last year, Governor Jerry Brown diverted that money (500 million dollars,) but at last these funds are going in the right place.

Under the new budget, about $230 million, or 26 percent, of the $872 million cap-and-trade money will go toward environmental justice efforts. That includes $75 million to weatherize low-income homes and $25 million for transit and intercity rail networks in poor communities. A program called Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities run by the state’s Strategic Growth Council will get $130 million to plan and build new housing and add amenities like public transit to existing neighborhoods.

Calif. Earmarks a Quarter of its Cap-and-Trade Riches for Environmental Justice by Amy Nordrum, Inside Climate News

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Throughout the developing world, women and girls are expected to face a harder time of it because of global warming. A recent series of papers out of Jamaica looks at some of the impacts of natural disasters and drought based on gender.

Apart from hurricanes, water shortages and droughts are also consequences of climate change which impact the poor and vulnerable within the society. Women and children in rural areas often find themselves having to go in search of water for domestic use.

“Women in general make up a large number of the vulnerable in communities that are highly dependent on local natural resources to survive,” said Tesi Scott.

Women said more vulnerable to climate change, Jamaica Observer

If you want to learn more about climate change and women, read the UN’s Women Watch page, Women, Gender Equality and Climate Change.

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I find that my mind repels the idea that Global Warming is as serious as scientists say it is. Who can grasp the magnitude of the crisis without denying it in part or negotiating its impacts away? “Well, I recycle,” we say trying comfort ourselves believing that if we each did our part, we will ultimately lick this current crisis. When we realize that our individual efforts do not even begin to come close enough to addressing the problem, we look to science and innovation for a cure, “Surely technology will save us.”

No doubt technology will play a large part in helping us to mitigate and adapt to climate change. We will need to develop all sorts of new technologies to capture carbon and create new energy sources that do not pollute. We are not there yet, and we need to dispossess ourselves of the notion that we can simply rely on technology to pull us out of the climate mess. Doug Struck of the Boston Globes recently wrote about a talk given by a Swiss scientist visiting the US.

“Technology will bring us a long way. But we will need also a change in our lifestyle,” he said. “It’s a grim message, but a true message. Science and technology is useful, but if you want to save the earth, you need also to work on the other side, on reducing our energy use.”

No magic bullet for climate change, Swiss scientist says by Doug Struck, Boston Globe

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If you want to get involved with a group of people working hard to change the way we use energy through a market-driven approach that will curb consumption and encourage alternatives to greenhouse gases, check out the Citizens Climate Lobby.

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